Recent Storm Damage Posts

Heavy Rains Can Cause A Nasty Problem

1/22/2020 (Permalink)

Heavy rains can put a lot of stress on the local drainage systems. When the sewer system reaches maximum volume waste water is forced out through floor drains, tubs, or any plumbing connected to the city sewer. Buildings with basements are particularly susceptible.

These situations are real health hazards. The water can contain solid waste and many other pathogenic hazards. It is never acceptable to enter areas affected by a sewer back up unprotected.

At Risk: With these kinds of health hazards all are considered at rick when in this environment but some are more susceptible than others. The very young, the very old, and anyone with a compromised immune system need to steer clear of these areas.

Category 3: All water damages are classified by category based on the degree of contaminationOne, being the cleanest down to three, which is considered grossly contaminated. Many times, you will hear this kind of loss be referred to as “Black” water.

Personal Protection: The IICRC has a strict standard for handling a water damage such as a sewer backup because of the potential health concerns. All persons who are involved with the clean up of a sewer backup are required to wear personal protective equipment. In this case it calls for boots, gloves, protective clothing, and a full-face respirator to protect the eyes and respiratory system.

Staying Safe During a Storm

1/21/2020 (Permalink)

Priorities, people!  The most important thing is staying safe during a storm.  There will be plenty of time to review the damage, later.  In our modern, technology-driven age, we can sometimes forget how powerful the forces of nature are.  Here’s a few tips on how to protect your family and friends.

If You’re Outdoors

Find Shelter Fast

In the event that you’re caught in a thunder and lightning rainstorm, the best way to reduce the chances of danger is to get inside a protective structure.  If you can see lightning, there’s a chance it can hurt you.   Make sure and bring your pets inside with you and protect them, too.

Things to definitely avoid:  standing under a tree and being near powerlines.   Lightning is attracted to tall objects and  you could get hurt, either by the tree if it should crack or the lightning could hit you, too.  High voltage powerlines can come down in heavy storms and once down, move like writhing snakes.  People have been killed because they were ‘whipped’ and electrocuted by powerlines.

Should a protective building not be near, get in a car with metal roof and sides.  Metal is a great conductor of electricity.  Better to have the voltage go around you instead of through you!

Stay Off your Landline

Lightning has been known to travel through telephone wires.  Shocks from landlines are actually the leading source of lightning-related injuries. 

Avoid Potentially Wet Areas

This includes swimming pools and even showers and bathtubs.  Water is also an excellent conductor of electricity.  So is metal plumbing.  Lightning can run through metal pipes and shock you if you touch a metal faucet at the time it strikes.

What if You Can’t Get Inside?

There are just some times when there are no protective structures.  In these cases, the following rules apply:

Get to a lower elevation.  Lightning strikes less often at lower elevations.

Avoid being in situations where you are the tallest object.  This could include open meadows, athletic fields, golf courses etc.  Remember, the tallest objects in an area are practically ‘lightning targets’.  Don’t be one!

If you feel a staticky sensation in your hair, it could be that a lightning strike is imminent.  In this case, assume a crouched position transferring your weight to the balls of your feet with your shoes touching.  Next, tuck your head and cover your ears (make yourself as small as possible). This will improve the odds of avoiding a direct hit.  When the staticky sensation passes, make a ‘bee line’ for the nearest car or building.

If You’re Driving

Don’t Touch

The safest car to be in during a lightning storm is one where the entire cabin is composed of metal – something that isn’t found as commonly anymore.  Non-metallic materials actually increase the chances that the passengers may be injured.  In the event that the car is hit, the current may pass through the vehicle’s electrical systems, the GPS, cell phone chargers, car door handles, foot pedals, steering column and steering wheel.

The best advice in a situation like this is not to touch anything metal in the car’s cabin during the storm – including the radio. 

Drivers should also avoid driving through standing water.  Engines can easily stall in as little as 6” of water.  This increases the chances of being hit by another vehicle or getting caught in a flash flood.

Moving Past the Storm.  Restoration Services.

While these tips will not protect your property, they could save your life!  In the event that you should require water or storm damage restoration after the storm has passed, SERVPRO is here to help.

There when you need us.  We’re here for you when you need us most.  In many cases, we’ll be at your door within an hour of your call.

Share our knowledge.  Experience has shown us that what most people want is to understand what is happening all through the restoration process. 

When Lightning Strikes

11/21/2019 (Permalink)

Lightning is one of the leading causes of weather-related fatalities. The odds of being struck by lightning in a year are only around 1 in 500,000, some factors can put you at risk for being struck. Here are a few lightning safety tips.

Be aware. Check the forecast before participating in outdoor activities. If it calls for thunderstorms, postpone your trip or activity, or make sure adequate safe shelter is available.

Go indoors. Remember the phrase, “When thunder roars, go indoors.” Find a safe, enclosed shelter when you hear thunder. Safe shelters include homes, offices, shopping centers, and hard-top vehicles with the windows rolled up.

Avoid windows, doors, porches, and concrete. Do not lie on concrete floors and avoid leaning on concrete walls. Lightning can travel through any metal wires or bars in concrete walls or flooring.

Avoid water. Do not bathe, shower, wash dishes, or have any other contact with water during a thunderstorm because lightning can travel through a building’s plumbing.

Avoid electronic equipment. Do not use computers, laptops, game systems, washers, dryers, stoves, or anything connected to an electrical outlet. Lightning can travel through electrical systems, radio, and television reception systems, and any metal wires or bars in concrete walls or flooring. Equip homes and offices with whole-house surge protectors to protect appliances.

Be Storm Smart And Ready

11/12/2019 (Permalink)

Severe weather can happen any time, and anywhere. Every year, Americans cope with an average of the following intense storms*:

·         10,000 severe thunderstorms

·         5,000 floods or flash floods

·         1,000 tornadoes

·         2 land falling, deadly hurricanes

Approximately 98% of all presidential declared disasters are weather-related, leading to around 500 deaths per year and nearly $15 billion in damage.* Knowing your risk of severe weather, taking action and being an example are some steps you can take to be more prepared to save your life and the lives of others.

Know Your Risk. The first step is to understand the type of hazardous weather that can affect where you live and work, and how the weather could impact you, business and your family. Check the weather forecast regularly, obtain a NOAA Weather Radio, and about Wireless Emergency Alerts. 

Take Action. Take the next step in severe weather preparedness is to create a communications plan for your home or business. Put together or purchase an emergency kit. Keep important papers and valuables in a safe place.

Be an Example. Share your story with co-workers and family and friends on Facebook or Twitter. Your preparedness story will inspire others to do the same.

*Facts provided by http://www.stormready.noaa.gov.

Managing Without Power seen storm damage lead to power outages.

8/12/2019 (Permalink)

Managing Without Power seen storm damage lead to power outages.  

A power outage can:

  • Disrupt communication
  • Make transportation difficult
  • Shut down water pipes
  • Close businesses, grocery stores, gas stations, banks, ATMS, other services
  • Lead to food spoilage
  • Lead to contaminated water
  • Disable medical devices

During a power outage County, be sure to:

  • Keep freezer & refrigerator doors closed. It will reduce the chance of food spoilage
  • User generators only outdoors and away from windows
  • Disconnect appliances/electronics. Power surges can destroy equipment
  • Have already set up plan to refrigerate medicines
  • For people who use power wheelchairs, have a backup battery.You may also need a manual chair
  • The local power company should already know that someone in your home relies on medical devices
  • Do not use a gas stove or oven to heat your homeor business
  • If travel is safe, go to another location for proper heating or cooling
  • Check on your neighbors.

Staying Safe During a Storm

7/17/2019 (Permalink)

Priorities, people!  The most important thing is staying safe during a storm.  There will be plenty of time to review the damage, later.  In our modern, technology-driven age, we can sometimes forget how powerful the forces of nature are.  Here’s a few tips on how to protect your family and friends.

If You’re Outdoors

Find Shelter Fast

In the event that you’re caught in a thunder and lightning rainstorm, the best way to reduce the chances of danger is to get inside a protective structure.  If you can see lightning, there’s a chance it can hurt you.   Make sure and bring your pets inside with you and protect them, too.

Things to definitely avoid:  standing under a tree and being near powerlines.   Lightning is attracted to tall objects and  you could get hurt, either by the tree if it should crack or the lightning could hit you, too.  High voltage powerlines can come down in heavy storms and once down, move like writhing snakes.  People have been killed because they were ‘whipped’ and electrocuted by powerlines.

Should a protective building not be near, get in a car with metal roof and sides.  Metal is a great conductor of electricity.  Better to have the voltage go around you instead of through you!

Stay Off your Landline

Lightning has been known to travel through telephone wires.  Shocks from landlines are actually the leading source of lightning-related injuries. 

Avoid Potentially Wet Areas

This includes swimming pools and even showers and bathtubs.  Water is also an excellent conductor of electricity.  So is metal plumbing.  Lightning can run through metal pipes and shock you if you touch a metal faucet at the time it strikes.

What if You Can’t Get Inside?

There are just some times when there are no protective structures.  In these cases, the following rules apply:

Get to a lower elevation.  Lightning strikes less often at lower elevations.

Avoid being in situations where you are the tallest object.  This could include open meadows, athletic fields, golf courses etc.  Remember, the tallest objects in an area are practically ‘lightning targets’.  Don’t be one!

If you feel a staticky sensation in your hair, it could be that a lightning strike is imminent.  In this case, assume a crouched position transferring your weight to the balls of your feet with your shoes touching.  Next, tuck your head and cover your ears (make yourself as small as possible). This will improve the odds of avoiding a direct hit.  When the staticky sensation passes, make a ‘bee line’ for the nearest car or building.

If You’re Driving

Don’t Touch

The safest car to be in during a lightning storm is one where the entire cabin is composed of metal – something that isn’t found as commonly anymore.  Non-metallic materials actually increase the chances that the passengers may be injured.  In the event that the car is hit, the current may pass through the vehicle’s electrical systems, the GPS, cell phone chargers, car door handles, foot pedals, steering column and steering wheel.

The best advice in a situation like this is not to touch anything metal in the car’s cabin during the storm – including the radio. 

Drivers should also avoid driving through standing water.  Engines can easily stall in as little as 6” of water.  This increases the chances of being hit by another vehicle or getting caught in a flash flood.

Moving Past the Storm.  Restoration Services.

While these tips will not protect your property, they could save your life!  In the event that you should require water or storm damage restoration after the storm has passed, SERVPRO is here to help.  . 

There when you need us.  We’re here for you when you need us most.  In many cases, we’ll be at your door within an hour of your call.

Share our knowledge.  Experience has shown us that what most people want is to understand what is happening all through the restoration process. 

Integrity.  You’ve been through something horrible.  Now you need someone you can trust.  Our word is our bond.

Someone you can count on.  Most of our business comes from word of mouth referrals.  To keep that going, we know we’re only as good as our latest job.  You’ll always receive our very best work.

Winter Water Damage

11/21/2018 (Permalink)

In the wintertime, we tend to forget about mold becoming an issue in the home. For the most part, we associate mold with humid summer days creating the perfect environment for mold growth in dark, damp spaces… but this is not always the case. For example, mold growth can strike quickly after a flood or fire even in the winter. We recently encountered a home in which the pipes had burst on the third floor of the dwelling. With no one home, the water soaked the home for 2 days before the leak was discovered. Our crew began working in the home within 72 hours of the disaster and within that time mold growth could be seen on wet surfaces throughout the house. If not properly treated mold can quickly make its way into difficult to find places like vents and ducts where it may cause health issues to those in the home if not removed.

SERVPRO Assures Safety During Restoration Services

9/5/2018 (Permalink)

Torrential downpours in Minnetonka Mills have wreaked havoc on many homes in the area. These rains have caused various homes to become flooded, leaving many homeowners with a big problem on their hands. Basement flooding in these situations is widespread, and it needs to be taken care of quickly to avoid further damages.

If your home was unfortunate enough to experience the effects of these storms, you want to call in the professionals at SERVPRO for help. We have all the training, tools, and experience needed to clean up the FLOOD DAMAGE in your basement. We understand that time is of the essence as well, so we waste no time in getting to your home once you contact us.

When the job site is unsanitary such as floodwaters, we use personal protective equipment to keep workers safe while working and so we comply with safety regulations.

Gloves are worn by our staff to protect hands from absorbing substances or becoming contaminated with microorganisms. The kind of glove is selected based on its ability to protect against the hazards and conditions of the work environment. When there are contaminants that have to be contained, surgical gloves can be worn underneath outer gloves for protection as we remove contaminated protective clothing.

In a basement flooding situation, SERVPRO techs also need eye protection to protect from punctures from flying particles or corrosive substances or burns. If there is extensive mold growth, mold spores can infect eyes, so full-face respirators or goggles could be required.

The kind of respirator we choose is based on the dangers encountered. Respirators for mold remediation, black water damage, or the application of chemicals have to use HEPA particulate filters and organic vapor filters.

Boots can protect our feet from electrical hazards and skin from contact with harmful substances. Boots may be equipped with steel shanks for the ball of the foot and steel soles and toes for further protection.

Water Removal Can Save Your Home

9/5/2018 (Permalink)

Water Removal Can Save Your Home

Torrential storms that hit Groveland can cause untold amounts of damage to homes. In addition to downed trees and the direct damage created by smashed roofs and torn apart siding, rainwater can quickly become standing water. Floors face the most of this problem, but walls and furnishings can also find themselves needing professional mitigation.

When a storm event affects your home, SERVPRO's strategy begins with water removable efforts. Our primary assessment's findings determine the best equipment for extracting water the most efficiently. SERVPRO's technicians remove all water, from the obvious standing water to the moisture in cracks and crevices to the humidity in the air using state-of-the-art equipment. Our high-tech measuring devices detect the slightest elevations of moisture, ensuring we miss nothing in the process of restoring your home's usually dry state.

The entire water removal process can take a while, but minimizing the damage is easy through our expert handling of materials and belongings. Elevated moisture happens throughout a home because the humidity is trapped and has no place to go as it seeks equilibrium by saturating drier areas. As humidity flows through a home, it can damage areas and belongings that never saw a drop of rain or flood water.

Part of our equipment measures the humidity in a home, as this is a particularly important piece of information that gives us insight into how quickly the water removal process is progressing. These measurements are taken in various areas of your home, just as our technicians place air movers, different types of heaters, and dehumidifiers in strategic locations to remove any moisture and humidity remaining in those areas. When the measurements indicate that humidity levels are once again normal, we can then finish with odor control and the final walk-through with our customers.

Be Storm Ready, Be Storm Smart

3/27/2018 (Permalink)

Severe weather can happen any time, and anywhere. Each year, Americans cope with an average of the following intense storms*:

·         10,000 severe thunderstorms

·         5,000 floods or flash floods

·         1,000 tornadoes

·         2 land falling, deadly hurricanes

Approximately 98 percent of all presidentially declared disasters are weather-related, leading to around 500 deaths per year and nearly $15 billion in damage.* Knowing your risk of severe weather, taking action and being an example are just a few steps you can take to be better prepared to save your life and assist in saving the lives of others.

Know Your Risk. The first step to becoming weather-ready is to understand the type of hazardous weather that can affect where you live and work, and how the weather could impact you, your business and your family. Check the weather forecast regularly, obtain a NOAA Weather Radio, and learn about Wireless Emergency Alerts. Severe weather comes in many forms and your shelter plan should include all types of local hazards.

Take Action. Take the next step in severe weather preparedness by creating a communications plan for your home or business. Put together or purchase an emergency kit. Keep important papers and valuables in a safe place.

Be an Example. Once you have taken action to prepare for severe weather, share your story with co-workers and family and friends on Facebook or Twitter. Your preparedness story will inspire others to do the same.

*Facts provided by http://www.stormready.noaa.gov.

Hurricane Preparedness Week is Almost Here...

5/13/2016 (Permalink)

Look familiar?

Hurricane Preparedness:

Summer is approaching and that means another hurricane season is soon to begin. While June 1st marks the official start of hurricane season, May is a month for hurricane awareness and preparation. The National Hurricane Center states,

“A lack of hurricane awareness and preparation are common threads among all major hurricane disasters. By knowing your vulnerability and what actions you should take, you can reduce the effects of a hurricane disaster.”

This year National Hurricane Preparedness Week will be held May 15th through May 21st. The goal of Hurricane Preparedness Week is to help educate citizens by providing information about hurricane hazards and preparation, to help protect the public and their families.The more you know about preparing yourself the better you will be able to handle a disaster.

Go to:  http://www.nws.noaa.gov/com/weatherreadynation/hurricane_preparedness.html for more information.